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Monthly Archives: May 2014

Aussies on the job

Ladder Ranch is host to many folks, some paid, some unpaid, and some even paying. Over the years, we have formed many wonderful friendships with the visitors who pass through our landscape. This year, we have had the great fun of hosting Will and Ali, Aussies who showed up at just the right time (right after the cook had quit and just as lambing was getting under way). They have jumped right in and helped with everything from soup (that would be Ali) and once docking commences–to nuts. Here they are helping with the shearing of the yearling ewes. I observed, “It looks like Ali is doing all the work, while Eamon and Will are standing around bullchatting.” Will responded, ” Yup, that’s pretty much what they say back home.”

Ali working--Eamon and Will visiting

Ali working–Eamon and Will visiting

Eamon and Will on the move, but Eamon's dog is actually bringing up the sheep!

Eamon and Will on the move, with Eamon’s dog, Chica, actually bringing up the sheep! Actually, it took all hands AND the dog to get the job done.

We also like child labor--Seamus and Maeve work the chute.

We also like child labor–Seamus and Maeve work the chute.

 

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Irrigation equipment

We irrigate our alfalfa with side-roll irrigation equipment. This allows us to grow alfalfa on a mesa with deep rich volcanic soil. Alas, equipment needs repair and new parts from time to time. My sidekick Siobhan and I made a trip to Vernal, Utah–a center for intensive irrigation–to buy replacement parts for our vintage system. We know Jerry Palen, and he calls me a true Flo–his cartoon wife who goes to buy parts without much information or knowledge. That was indeed my situation, but with the help of a very intuitive and competent salesperson, I managed to come home with the right stuff.

irrigation equipment replacement parts on the flatbed trailer

irrigation equipment replacement parts on the flatbed trailer

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2014 in Events

 

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Spring storm

Squaw Mountain

Squaw Mountain

Sure enough–as soon as we finished shearing and started lambing, a cold, windy, snowy storm moved in. While we are happy to see the much-needed moisture, we have scrambled to try to save lambs. We estimate we lost about 150 lambs due to the severe weather. Our lambing grounds on Loco got a foot of fresh snow and we couldn’t get in there for several days. The herders were well-provisioned but couldn’t do much except get the ewes into sheltered areas.

This is the first year we have lambed ewes through our new shed on the private land on Cottonwood. We had preg tested the mothers of the replacement ewe lambs in March, and we sorted the mothers of twins into a bunch to be shed lambed. Our crew piled the straw bales to create wind breaks at each end of the shed, and were able to save most of the new lambs in the shed. We lamb later than most of our neighbors, and it is always a gamble.

Lambing shed with straw windbreak

Lambing shed with straw windbreak

Ewes pregnant with twin lambs sheltering in the shed

Ewes pregnant with twin lambs sheltering in the shed

Ewes huddled behind tarp windbreaks

Ewes huddled behind tarp windbreaks

Baker's Peak

Baker’s Peak

Battle Mountain

Battle Mountain

Sheep Mountain

Sheep Mountain

Horses at the lambing shed, with Muddy Mountain

Horses at the lambing shed, with Muddy Mountain

Siobhan and Tiarnan in the mud

Siobhan and Tiarnan in the mud

 

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Wool

Raw wool

Raw wool

 
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Posted by on May 13, 2014 in Sheep

 

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Shearing–at last!

Unshorn white ewes in the front, black ewes in the back

Each year, we plan, and we plan, and we plan. Other than the weather, the annual shearing of the sheep is the most critical step in the ovine year over which we have little control. For their health and well-being, and for our financial bottom line, each sheep must be shorn each spring. We shear later than most other producers in our region, due to our high altitude and the dates dictated by our federal leases. This means that all the days the shearing crew loses throughout the spring due to weather, mechanical problems and other delays, pile up at the end while we anxiously await their arrival. We plan our trailing schedule around the anticipated commencement of shearing. We leave our winter quarters on the Red Desert around April 15th and head for our Badwater pasture, some five trailing days to the south. We like to shear there before trailing on to the Cottonwood lambing grounds, where the lambs start dropping about May 8th. May 8th also happens to be our “on-date” for the BLM portion of the lambing grounds, and it is pretty close to the date that the green grass starts popping.

It is another five or six days trailing from our Badwater pasture to Cottonwood, so ideally, the shearing is done by May 1st. This year, we scheduled shearing to commence on May 25th. If all goes well, it takes about six days to shear all the pregnant ewes, so this is still cutting it pretty close. It is stressful for the ewes to be shorn so close to lambing, but it is better for ewes, lambs and lambers for the shearing to be done. We have the facilities to shear on our private land on Cottonwood, but it is always a balancing act to make sure there is enough green grass there to sustain the ewes  before, during and after the shearing takes place.

As it happened, the shearing crew was able to arrive on May 2nd, due to weather, wind and other circumstances. We made the executive decision to send on one band of ewes on to Cottonwood, while we sheared the other two winter bunches at Badwater. It is hard on the ewes, heavy with lambs, to trail with the additional 10 pounds of wool on their backs. It is worse to be lambing on the trail, while we follow behind with horse trailers, picking up ewes with newborns. So we tried to find a balance, with the ewes carrying the replacement ewe lambs going ahead to be sure to be on the lambing grounds.

The shearing crew, Hoopes Shearing, is an eclectic international group of professional shearers. The contractors, Cliff and Dawna Hoopes, spend much of the year lining up visas to ensure that they have a crew on hand. This year’s crew was a multinational group of Aussies, Kiwis, Americans and even one Japanese guy. As it happened, the wool packing machine broke down on day two. “Don’t worry,” I told them. “We are in the oil field, and we can find a mobile welder.” Sure enough, we were able to find a welder who could travel to our broken down packer and repair it.

We had some problems due to stress on the ewes from being sheared so close to lambing. We also had stress on Meghan and Sharon since the ranch cook quit right before shearing. We were feeding our ground crew and the shearing crew, and the crew back at the ranch, AND working on the ground crew. We did manage, and nobody went hungry.

Everyone did their jobs, and the sheep did get sheared, first at Badwater and then at Cottonwood. We still have to shear the yearlings, since the Hoopes crew had to move on to other pregnant ewes.

Ewes in waiting

Ewes in waiting

Waiting their turn

Waiting their turn

Wool packing crew at work

Wool packing crew at work

After the breakdown of the press, a lot of wool was waiting to be bales.

After the breakdown of the press, a lot of wool was ready to be baled.

Out of the shed

Out of the shed

Shorn ewes waiting to be sprayed for keds

Shorn ewes waiting to be sprayed for keds

Flags flying over the purple Hoopes shed, Judas sheep in front

Flags flying over the purple Hoopes shed, Judas sheep in front

Siobhan and Edison give water to a stressed ewe

Siobhan and Edison give water to a stressed ewe

 

Ty running the wool press

Ty running the wool press

Herder with horses

Herder with horses

 

 

 

 

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