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Category Archives: Issues

Solving the problems of the world at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering

Horseman Torran Duncan with Dad, saddlemaker and rancher Keith Duncan.

Horseman Torran Duncan with Dad, saddlemaker and rancher Keith Duncan.

As I said, we were WORKING!  Pat, our son-in-law  and meat purveyor Chris Abel and I were on the panel that discussed “Food Production and the West.” We were joined by California “urban farmer” A.G. Kawamura, and Family Farm Alliance Executive Director Dan Keppen. Since our roundtable was scheduled at the same time as Baxter Black’s show, we were wondering if anyone would show up. We visited with Dr. Black in the Green Room before the show, and I told him I hoped we didn’t draw away from his sold-our, lottery only show. Luckily, a goodly number of dedicated issue junkies showed up (or maybe those who didn’t draw a Baxter Black ticket–but, hey, a girl can dream!).

Pat, fellow Carbon County resident and wonderful singer Trinity Seeley, and baxter Black, probably discussing food policy

Pat, fellow Carbon County resident and wonderful singer Trinity Seeley, and Baxter Black, probably discussing food policy

Chris, Dan,Pat, Sharon, and AG discussing how to feed 9+billion people in a few years

Chris, Dan,Pat, Sharon, and AG discussing how to feed 9+billion people in a few years

Keynote speaker Temple Grandin with Chris Abel.

Keynote speaker Temple Grandin with Chris Abel.

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2014 in Events, Family, Folks, Issues, Musings

 

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Meghan wows ’em at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering

Meghan and the young ranchers' panel

Meghan and the young ranchers’ panel

Blog fans may assume that our family attended the 30th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering so that we could have a fabulous time listening to poetry and music, and viewing Western Art and Gear… oh, and eating Basque food and imbibing the occasional Picon Punch. No siree–we were WORKING!  Here’s a photo of Meghan, along with other young ranchers, discussing intergenerational transfer and the future of ranching. Her husband Brian Lally was there to support her, and looked plenty nervous when the moderator asked the panelists what they fought about with their spouses. Joe (on the right) wisely answered that he has learned that his wife is always right. Meghan honestly answered “time management”. Brian gave a sigh of relief. I was glad that it wasn’t me on the spot!

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2014 in Events, Family, Folks, Issues

 

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Iceland, the Northern Lights and Buckets

Sharon and Pat at the beach near Vic, Iceland

Sharon and Pat at the beach near Vic, Iceland

riders near Vic

riders near Vic

Icelandic horses near Selfoss

Icelandic horses near Selfoss, descended from Viking stock

It has been my dream (read Bucket List) to visit Iceland in the winter to see the Northern Lights.  When I have expressed this goal to friends, the usual reaction is something like,”Whadaya, nuts?!”  I recently turned 60, and at the end of a really wonderful party attended by family and friends, Pat handed me a book on Iceland.

“We leave on Wednesday,” he said.  This was a Saturday.

We did get to see the Northern Lights, which as it turns out, is not at all a sure thing.  We also stayed on two farms and were treated to tours and long discussions about livestock and farming in Iceland.  Almost all of Iceland’s many tourists visit in the summer months (go figure) so folks had time to spend with us.

We learned that not only are the horses, sheep and cows descended from the original animals that came from Scandanavia in the late 800’s, but most of the people are too.  Turns out the Vikings stopped by Ireland and Scotland to pick up “thralls” on their way to Iceland, so the people are of both Nordic and Celtic descent

Here are some photos of Iceland in winter..

farm with shelter belt to protect from rock slides

farm with shelter belt to protect from rock slides

Icelandic ewes, descended from Viking stock

Icelandic ewes, descended from Viking stock

Icelandic sheep in barn, where they spend most of the winter

Icelandic sheep in barn, where they spend most of the winter

Pat with our new-found farmer friends

Pat with our new-found farmer friends

Idelandic cat and cow

Idelandic cat and cow

Proud farmer.  Each cow has a name, production records and lineage going back to the Vikings.

Proud farmer. Each cow has a name, production records and lineage going back to the Vikings.

Sharon visits with a farmer about his sheep

Sharon visits with a farmer about his sheep

church near Vic

church near Vic

Looking south to the sun overt the North Atlantic

Looking south to the sun overt the North Atlantic

the mountains north of Vic

the mountains north of Vic

Two night trolls were pushing a ship when they were caught by the morning light and turned to stone

Two night trolls  were pushing a ship when they were caught by the morning light and turned to stone

sign on the beach--sadly I couldn't read it

sign on the beach–sadly I couldn’t read it

Sharon with waterfall

Sharon with waterfall

Pat and host, sheep

our host and Pat with Icelandic sheep

 

Blue Lagoon bathers

Blue Lagoon bathers

not the Northern Lights, but sunrise near Selfoss

not the Northern Lights, but sunrise near Selfoss

 
 

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Dry season

The days unfold–one warm dry sunny day after the next.  The neighbors gather and talk of only one subject–when will it snow?  We all have tales to tell.  Only two years ago, we were lamenting because we had to start feeding hay two weeks before Thanksgiving.  This year, some of us still have some rough feed we can use for the cows and horses–the tall dry grasses left under the trees that couldn’t be reached by the mower during haying season.  Some have been feeding hay for months, after the summer pastures came up short and the fall pastures were used early.  Some have shipped animals out because of the lack or expense of feed.  Drought in the corn states and demand from ethanol have made corn–the staple of livestock feed–prohibitively expensive.  The government’s mandates, and lack of action on disaster programs mean that the livestock sector has been sacrificed as farmers are being encouraged to grow fuel in place of food.  Cattle and sheep, but also dairy (especially dairy!), poultry, hogs, and even catfish are being driven into loss as corn prices soar.

We continue on, unhampered by storms or ice or cold.

the Hampshire bucks at Powder Flat

Bucks drinking from the tank at Powder Flat

Filomeno and Antonio with horse they are breaking

Dunkin with ewe friends

Maeve, ready to load truck

wagons at Cottonwood

 

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Little Snake River Valley conservation efforts

Rock structure in Battle Creek to enhance fish habitat and irrigation

Our valley, the Little Snake, is an area blessed with abundant natural resources. Community members recognize the value of the abundant wildlife, habitat for all sorts of fish and fowl, and rich agricultural lands.  Many folks who live here have made a commitment to working with a number of partners in order to enhance these resources.

On our ranch, we have worked extensively with the U.S, Fish and Wildlife Service’s program, Partners for Fish and Wildlife. as well as the Wyoming Game and Fish, the Little Snake River Conservation District, the USDA conservation programs, and many other interest groups to keep our operation healthy and productive.

Here is an article written by Mindy Meade Vohland, a wildlife biologist and our go-to person on our Battle Creek fishery project.

Mindy Mead Vohland

Land Ethic Fuels Public-Private Conservation Efforts in the Little Snake River Basin, WY
By Mindy Meade Vohland
Communities within The Little Snake River valley have a long and remarkable history of natural resource conservation. Conservation partnerships in this region demonstrate not only that wildlife and agriculture are mutually compatible, but that restoration efforts can reap positive rewards for both.

The Little Snake River drains the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Mountains and snakes westward along the Wyoming-Colorado border, ever broadening until it reaches the Yampa River and ultimately, the Green River Basin in Colorado.

The Little Snake River Valley has always supported productive wildlife and game populations. In 1844, explorer John C. Fremont said of the area:
“The country here appeared more variously stocked with game than any part of the Rocky Mountains we had visited: and its abundance is owing to the excellent pasturage…”

The excellent pasturage led to the establishment of viable livestock operations, starting with cattle in 1872. Today, ranching and energy production are the primary land uses.  An abundance of game, including some of Wyoming’s largest populations of elk, deer, and antelope, still thrives alongside existing ranches.

The waters of the Little Snake River are fertile grounds for Colorado River cutthroat trout and other fish. This intact aquatic ecosystem and its associated riparian and wetland areas provide habitat for over 150 bird species, including a large, stable population of Greater Sage-Grouse and the largest population of Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse in Wyoming. Regionally, these extraordinary wildlife populations have engendered a community land ethic that links the viability of lifestyle and working landscapes to natural resource stewardship
and conservation. Indeed, local residents and agricultural community members typify this ethos, having established in 1954 the Little Snake River Conservation District (District), a property tax assessment to fund conservation work within the Basin (in 1990), and the first locally led collaborative effort for a 500,000-acre watershed improvement project (in 1993). In 1996, they established a national “Seeking Common Ground” project that demonstrated how livestock operations can positively co-exist with fish and wildlife.

To be sure, landowners, along with government and non-profit partners, possess the willingness and drive to further landscape-level conservation in the Little Snake River Basin. For example, the Muddy Creek Wetlands near Dad, WY, a project of the District and its partners, is the largest constructed wetland complex in Wyoming. Hundreds of species of waterbirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl from both the Pacific and Central Flyways utilize the area for breeding and migration; the site is a WY-Audubon Important Bird Area.

Another project, the “Little Snake River Basin Aspen Conservation Joint Venture,” is set to restore over 12,000 acres of aspen woodlands.  Over 16 miles of river and stream projects have been completed on the mainstem of the Little Snake River and within its tributaries.  These projects include improving fish passage and riparian plant communities as well as restoring hydrology to perched water tables to enhance oxbow slough wetlands and streamside cottonwood galleries.

Lastly, three area ranches have undertaken conservation easements in order to protect natural resources, keep agricultural operations and economic benefits intact, and protect the scenic landscape from subdivision.

“We are proud that we can provide for both wildlife and our agricultural operation, and enhance them both,” said Patrick O’Toole, a private landowner (and IWJV board member) whose Ladder Ranch partnered with The Nature Conservancy in a conservation easement. Ladder Ranch is a sustainable ranching operation that also serves as an ecotourism destination.

Successes such as these were spurred by a communal land conservation ethic, but realized by a body of collaborative, private-public conservation efforts, many of which were led by the Little Snake River Conservation District. Accordingly, the District received the National Association of Conservation District West Region Collaborative Conservation Partnership Award in 2008 and was named “Conservation Partner of the Year” by the Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust board in 2010.

Larry Hicks, Resource Coordinator of the Little Snake River Conservation District, describes his work and the magic of the Little River landscape:  “I came here looking for a job. In my 21-year journey, I found my soul, a community and a new way of life – one that exemplifies the moral principles of the land ethic. It’s who we are.”

Mindy Meade Vohland is Wildlife Biologist for Partners for Fish & Wildlife (a division of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

Editor’s note: In 2010, the Intermountain West Joint Venture helped catalyze a small NAWCA grant for oxbow wetlands restoration in Wyoming and is looking forward to helping catalyze more conservation partnerships in the region.