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Tag Archives: Pepe

Sage chickens–sort of

chickens at Chain Lake

So just when you think you’ve seen it all…

A couple of days ago, Pepe called Meghan at the cookhouse. He is tending sheep on our permits on the Red Desert. I heard Meghan say, “gallinas?! domesticados?!” (chickens?! domesticated?!).

Apparently, someone turned loose some hens and one rooster. Meghan called the BLM Range Conservationist, who tried, unsuccessfully, to catch them. The Chain Lakes allotment is checkerboard, with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department owning every other section. Mike, the Range Con, then turned the matter over to the Game and Fish.

They are fowl, if not fish.

What’s amazing is that they haven’t been eaten by coyotes!

 
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Posted by on March 22, 2017 in Animals, Nature and Wildlife

 

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To lamb or not to lamb, that is the question

If it’s March, it must be time to pregnancy test. We breed the best of our Rambouillet ewes to Rambouillet rams, thereby ensuring a new crop of replacement ewe lambs, as well as their brothers/cousins. Since purebred whiteface lambs are more vulnerable at birth, especially the twins, we pregnancy check the moms so that the ewes carrying twins can lamb in the sheds. The rest of the Rambouillet ewes are bred to our Hampshire rams. Their lambs have hybrid vigor and usually do fine with drop lambing on the range. Our friend Geri Parsons from Optimal Livestock Services comes up each March at mid-pregnancy to check the ewes and call out “single”, “twins”, “open” and even “triplets”. Meghan and her crew appropriately marked the ewes with a paint dab on their heads to signify their status for later sorting. Geri usually braves chill winds and long drives for several days to accomplish this task. Here’s some photos of this year’s pregnancy checking.

Ewes, waiting for the verdict

Pepe at the chute, Geri’s office in the tent

 

It was REALLY MUDDY!!!

Chris bringing up the ewes

Pregnancy testing crew–Sam the Border collie, Modesto, Maeve, Meghan, Pepe, Tiarnan, Geri, Chris

 

the view from Eagle’s Nest, looking east

 

 

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Bucks leaving

Pepe, Meghan and Sam with the bucks

Pepe, Meghan and Sam with the bucks

 

Mid-December brings true love to our ewes and rams. The rams, at least, have been waiting in the wings since, well, last winter. Mid-January brings rest to the bucks, who have been working hard for a month. It is time to bring some of them home. Here are Pepe and Meghan loading bucks for the trip home. You can see that it is deep winter on the Red Desert. We were worried about not having enough snow for the ewes to eat for water. Now we are worried about too much crust on the snow for them to graze. Pepe and the other herders feed them corn every day to keep them strong. And pregnant.

Waiting to go home

Waiting to go home

Meghan hooking up the horsetrailer

Meghan hooking up the horsetrailer

Dos Amigos

Dos Amigos

 
 

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Tres Amigos

Pepe. Eamon and Modesto on the Red Desert

Pepe. Eamon and Modesto on the Red Desert

 
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Posted by on December 21, 2016 in Family, Folks, Peruvian sheepherders

 

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Scenes from Almost Solstice

Rainbow over Powder Rim

Rainbow over Powder Rim

Feral horses on Racetrack

Feral horses on Racetrack

Yemerson with his sheep near Upper Powder Spring

Yemerson with his sheep near Upper Powder Spring

Guardian dogs chowing down on whole kernel corn

Guardian dogs chowing down on whole kernel corn

Filo with guard dogs

Filo with guard dogs

Yearling ewes and old ewes

Yearling ewes and old ewes

Unloading the bucks

Unloading the bucks

Bucks spot the girls

Bucks spot the girls

Horse on the Red Desert

Horse on the Red Desert

 siobhan and Meghan with Siobhan and Meghan with Rhen photo-bombing

Lambs on Harper feedlot

Lambs on Harper feedlot

Almost Solstice sunset

Almost Solstice sunset

Sunset over Sandman Mountain

Sunset over Sandman Mountain

 

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Minnesota Bound

Thinking about lower country

Thinking about lower country

Every fall, we have what we call “the good old ewes.”  These ewes are still sound, but aren’t quite up for another winter on the Red Desert. They are Minnesota bound. Sheep producers around Pipestone can offer them a comfier life at a lower altitude, with more shelter. They will be able to produce lambs and wool for several more years.

Pepe, Edgar and Raylor bringing up the ewes

Pepe, Edgar and Taylor bringing up the ewes

Meghan at the cutting gate

Meghan at the cutting gate

Ned, the brand inspector, and the trucker, loading.

Ned, the brand inspector, and the trucker, loading.

Now underemployed Guard Dog

Now underemployed Guard Dog

Meghan and Ned

Meghan and Ned

Ready to roll

Ready to roll

 

 

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Sorting the buck lambs

Purebred Hampshire and Rambouillet sheep, waiting for the sort.

Purebred Hampshire and Rambouillet sheep, ready for the sort.

Much of our lives revolves around reproduction…sometimes encouraging it, sometime avoiding it, but always managing it. Sheep reach sexual maturity at a relatively young age, so in July we must remove the buck lambs, born in March, from their mothers and the ewe herd. The conventional wisdom, at our latitude(about 41) is that ewes can be bred in any month with an “R” in it. It’s a bit more complicated than that, depending on factors such as the breed and nutrition, but we have learned not to overthink it. Suffice it to say that if you don’t want to be lambing at Christmastime or so, it’s a good idea to remove intact buck lambs from their mothers in July. We don’t want to wait until “AuRgust”!

Since we raise our own bucks, and they are getting to be pretty big guys, we put them into the corrals at the Johnson Ranch, where they summer north of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The buck lambs who pass the test to be replacement rams are weaned and taken to the Home Ranch, far away, we hope, from any ewes.

 

These guys will miss their moms, but they get to grow up to be Dads.

These guys will miss their moms, but they get to grow up to be dads.

Which one of these is not like the others? Pepe, Adolfo, Apolinario and Max are taking a lunch break.

Which one of these is not like the others? Pepe, Adolfo, Apolinario and Max are taking a lunch break.

 

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